Skip to content
live
live

Local MPP tables bill to end time changes in Ontario

If Bill 214 were to pass, Quebec and New York would have to agree to the same adjustment in order for it to come into affect.
110818-daylight saving time-time change-clock-AdobeStock_193287409
Stock photo.

Ottawa West-Nepean MPP Jeremy Roberts is trying to pave the way for Ontario to end the practice of changing our clocks twice a year.

He tabled Bill 214, the Time Amendment Act, on Wednesday, October 7.

If passed, Roberts says the bill will enable the Attorney General of Ontario (AGO) to move the province permanently to daylight time. 

The only catch is the AGO would only be able to bring this act into effect in coordination with the neighbouring jurisdictions of Quebec and New York.

But the bill does have some federal support.

"Glad to see this important topic coming back to the Legislative Assembly of Ontario as study after study has shown the benefits of a year-round Daylight-Saving Time," says Marie-France Lalonde, MP for Orléans. "People are tired of watching the sun set while they are still at work. Permanent DST means people who work a standard day shift -- and kids who go to school during the day get more daylight at the end of the day -- and it will make Ontario a safer and happier place."

Roberts explains that academic studies from across the world have suggested that time changes can cause serious negative effects, such as increased depression rates, heart attacks, strokes, and higher numbers of fatal collisions. Meanwhile, permanent daylights savings time would likely help promote more retail activity by giving consumers more hours of evening daylight.

Past proposals to end the time change have been met with resistance, given that there would be logistical difficulties making this change without Quebec and New York also following suit. 

Roberts believes this bill addresses these issues by ensuring that the Attorney General has discretion in when they will implement this change.

"I see this as an important first step towards fulfilling the public’s overwhelming desire to end this out-of-date practice.," says the MPP. "I believe that by showing leadership in taking this step, Ontario can encourage our counterparts in Quebec and New York State to take similar action so that, together, we can put this issue to bed, and all be better rested for it."

Clocks are set to fall back on November 1 this year.




Comments


Mike Vlasveld

About the Author: Mike Vlasveld

Mike Vlasveld, Village Media Community Editor, OttawaMatters.com
Read more
Rogers Media
2001 Thurston Drive Ottawa, ON, K1G 6C9 © 2006-2020 Rogers Media. All rights reserved.